Flower Blog - Floral Ideas and Arrangements

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Friday August 29th 2014

What Makes The Best Bouquet of Get Well Flowers

Phone calls, cards, balloons, and gifts are all traditional ways to cheer up a loved one who is ill; however, flowers do double duty, functioning as a way to convey your feelings and also as a sort of therapy for the sick. Many studies have shown that patients use less pain medication and are more positive with flowers and plants in their hospital room. There is even something called flower therapy, where flower essences are taken to alleviate stress and promote health and well-being. I am not at all surprised. As a florist, I see the happiness and health benefits of flowers daily. Nothing makes a person smile like receiving a bouquet of flowers. Are you having a trouble deciding on a get-well bouquet? Here are some great ideas.

Think Health

When giving flowers as a get-well gift, the last thing you want to do is make your loved one feel worse. Stay away from plants that could trigger allergies and strong-smelling flowers that could induce nausea in someone already sick. Carnations, chrysanthemums, and daisies are good choices. Roses that have a light fragrance are also a welcomed choice; is there anyone who doesn't love roses? If you have a loved one who is in the hospital for just a few days, you may want to consider sending the bouquet to the home instead of the hospital; that way, there will be no stress of gathering up all of the flower arrangements and transporting them back home.

Posted by Ava Rose in Get Well Flowers
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Friday August 22nd 2014

11 of the Worlds Most Unusual Flowers

In the past, I have posted about carnivorous plants, foul-smelling flowers, and flowers that bloom in the moonlight; you may be thinking that I've written about most of the unusual flowers in the world, but that is not the case! It seems like the list of unusual flowers goes on and on and that more are being discovered every day. I never tire of learning about them, either! I have compiled a list of 11 unusual flowers that range from the rare and endangered to ones that you can grow at home.

Flor de Muerto, Lisianthius nigrescens

This flower is unusual because it is the blackest naturally occurring flower known in the world. The long, tubular black flowers droop from stems that can reach 6 feet tall. In addition to being black, they appear to be wilted, which makes the common name "flower of death" quite fitting. However, it earned the name because where it grows, in Mexico, locals plant it near graves. You can try your hand at growing this tender perennial by buying seeds online.

Sea Poison Tree, Barringtonia asiatica

Photo via VanLap Hoang (Flickr)

Posted by Ava Rose in General
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Thursday August 14th 2014

Carnivorous Plants You Can Grow At Home

What comes to mind when you think about carnivorous plants? Perhaps you think of Seymour from Little Shop of Horrors, or if you are like me, you think of how you killed multiple Venus flytraps as a kid. Chances are, you think about plants that are nearly impossible to keep alive in your own home; however, if you choose the right plants and you are armed with the correct knowledge, you can grow a variety of these fascinating plants in your home or garden. They require care that is a little different than the average houseplant, but growing such awesome plants is well worth the patience required.

Background on Carnivorous Plants

Although carnivorous plants can be very different and have different requirements, they all have some basic things in common; they capture and kill insects and other small creatures using specialized leaves that function as traps, and they get needed nutrients from their prey. Carnivorous plants grow in soils that are low in nutrients that the plants need to survive, especially nitrogen. This is why when you grow carnivorous plants, you need to use a special carnivorous plant mix or mix your own; one good recipe for the plants below is one part milled peat to one part silica sand. Only butterworts require something different. You should not use tap water on these plants or the total dissolved solids in the water and the chemicals (which these plants are not accustomed to) will build up and kill your plant. Carnivorous plants will need to be repotted every year with a complete change of soil, and most do not require fertilizers, although you can feed them insects.

Posted by Ava Rose in Plant Care
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Monday August 11th 2014

Keeping Your Flowers from Wilting In the Summer Heat

The dog days of summer are here, and with them come hard times for some of our precious flowers, whether they are cut, potted, or in the garden. One of the unsightly symptoms of heat distress is wilting: Bbelieve it or not, in hot weather, wilting is kind of like the plant version of sweating! There are some steps that you can take to make your flowers more comfortable in the heat and to perhaps prevent wilting. Here are some tips I have put together for you.

What Causes Wilting?

Photo by Selena N.B.H. (Flickr)

Posted by Ava Rose in Plant Care
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Thursday July 24th 2014

Flowers that Pet Owners Should Avoid

Flowers are so beautiful that it is hard to believe that they are anything but good; however, many common flowers are extremely toxic to pets if eaten. I highly recommend that you keep the phone numbers for pet poison control handy and that you always know the common and scientific name of plants on your property so that you will be able to tell the medical personnel or poison control hotline staff what your pet ingested. Quick and accurate treatment will depend on this knowledge. If you have a pet that likes to eat plants or chew on things, then you should keep poisonous plants out of your pet's range or plant something else instead. Of course, the safest practice is to do your research and not plant poisonous plants on your property. Here are some of the famous femmes fatales of the garden to get you started.

Azaleas, Rhododendron species

Photo by: aussiegall (Flickr)

Posted by Ava Rose in General
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Wednesday July 16th 2014

Up Close and Personal - Some Tips for Macro Flower Photography

Summer is in full bloom, and now is the time to capture the fleeting beauty of flowers forever with your camera. Keep your camera handy, because you may be inspired in your garden or even on a country roadside; you never know where you will be when the perfect subject appears. I think every flower photographer should know how to take close-ups - after all, the beauty is in the details. Thanks to modern technology, taking macro photos is easy; simply select macro mode on a point-and-shoot digital camera or use a macro lens on a DSLR camera. Taking good macro photos, however, takes knowledge and practice. Read on for some simple tips on macro flower photography.

Select the Best Subject

When taking close-ups of flowers, it is essential to find a perfect subject. The slightest imperfections that can barely be seen by the naked eye will be magnified and prominent in macro photos. You should expect to spend a while looking for the right subject and plan accordingly; I say this from personal experience. It is also important to make sure nothing is in front of your chosen flower that will block the view. Remember, you can always remove foliage or other plants around your subject or bend and tie them out of the way. Consider taking a close-up of a flower with a butterfly, bee, or other insect - this will add interest.

Image via Beckwith-Zink (Diane) (Flickr)

Posted by Ava Rose in General
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Tuesday July 8th 2014

Fun Decorative DIY Projects For Your Garden

Image via Kevin Dooley (Flickr)

If you're like me, you spend a lot of time out in the garden watering, planting, pruning, and digging up weeds. I love looking out my kitchen window to see the beautiful blossoms on my blue petunias and purple pansies. And the brilliant yellow heads of my sunflowers look so happy in the morning sun! But why not place your personal stamp on your lovely garden with a decorative DIY project? Take a look at some simple projects that will make your garden all the more appealing.

Create a Wreath for Your Garden Fence

Posted by Ava Rose in General
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Wednesday July 2nd 2014

Edible Flowers For Your 4th of July BBQ

Photo by kalidoskopika (Flickr)

A Fourth of July barbecue is the perfect time to serve your friends some unique dishes. Instead of the usual fare, surprise them with a selection of foods made with edible flowers! Take a look at some recipes that will bring a dash of color and fragrance to your refreshment table.

Desserts

Give your party guests a thrill by putting a new twist on traditional favorites. Serve scoops of lavender ice cream in a collection of frosted bowls. No Fourth of July celebration is complete without this delicious treat. I like to watch the surprised faces of my guests as I serve them this fragrant alternative to the old standbys! Fresh mint brownies are also a fun option for all of the chocolate-lovers at your party.

Posted by Ava Rose in Edible Flowers
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Monday June 30th 2014

13 Flower-Themed Summer Libations

Photo via gail (Flickr)

One of my favorite things about being an event planner is choosing flower arrangements that suit the occasion. Summer is the perfect time to enjoy colorful blossoms and fragrances. But why confine your flowers to a vase? This week, my blog is all about mixing up some delicious drinks that feature a delightful flower theme. Cheers!

Posted by Sophie Pierce in General
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Wednesday June 25th 2014

Flowers for the Bees, Birds, and Butterflies

Let me tell you about the birds and the bees... oh, and the butterflies, too! You don't need to have a large or expensive garden to attract pollinators to your garden; in fact, birds, bees, and butterflies love what some of us consider weeds. The key to attracting birds, bees, and butterflies is to plant a wide variety of flowering annuals, perennials, and shrubs that are rich in nectar and that bloom at different times so there is always food available. It is also important to curtail use of pesticides and to provide shelter and water in your garden. One way to provide food and shelter is to leave seed heads and dead foliage standing on plants, especially over the winter - this is great news to me, since it means I don't have to tidy up my garden! Here are a few of my favorite flowers for attracting birds, bees, and butterflies.

Foxglove, Digitalis purpurea

Photo via e_chaya (Flickr)

Posted by Ava Rose in General
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